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asianheroes:

Yes, I too am riding on the Lin-sanity wave. In fact, it was the New York Knick’s victory of the Toronto Raptors tonight as well as following the recent Jeremy Lin story that inspired me to start this blog.Jeremy Lin is a Taiwanese-American professional basketball player and one of the few Asian Americans in NBA history. Not only that, he is also the first American player in the league to be of Taiwanese descent. After receiving no athletic scholarship offers out of high school and being undrafted out of college, the Harvard University graduate reached a partially guaranteed contract deal with his favourite team while growing up, the Golden State Warriors. He was later waived off the team as well as waived off from the Houston Rockets before he could show his true potential. The New York Knicks claimed him off waivers for a back-up spot after an injury of starting point guard Iman Shumpert. Since then, he has lead the New York Knicks onto a current six game win streak. What’s more astonishing is that Lin’s 109 points over the course of his first four starts are the most by any NBA player since the 1976-1977 season.His road to success had not been an easy one. During his college basketball days, he had heard nearly every East Asian racial slur thrown at him while on the court, including “open your eyes”, “wonton soup”, “orchestra’s on the other side of campus”, “sweet and sour pork”, and “go back to China.” One of his Harvard teammates recalls that once a fellow Ivy League player call him a “chink.” Even on one of his early training days with the Knicks before he exploded into superstardom, once when he went in for practice a security guard asked him if he was “one of the personal trainers.”Nonetheless, Lin always kept his head and focus in the game. As a result, his hard work and dedication has finally paid off and gotten him to where he is today.The ongoing story of Jeremy Lin sends a significant message out to the world in that you should never judge a book by its cover as well as to never judge a person by their stereotypes.  

asianheroes:

Yes, I too am riding on the Lin-sanity wave. In fact, it was the New York Knick’s victory of the Toronto Raptors tonight as well as following the recent Jeremy Lin story that inspired me to start this blog.

Jeremy Lin is a Taiwanese-American professional basketball player and one of the few Asian Americans in NBA history. Not only that, he is also the first American player in the league to be of Taiwanese descent. After receiving no athletic scholarship offers out of high school and being undrafted out of college, the Harvard University graduate reached a partially guaranteed contract deal with his favourite team while growing up, the Golden State Warriors.

He was later waived off the team as well as waived off from the Houston Rockets before he could show his true potential. The New York Knicks claimed him off waivers for a back-up spot after an injury of starting point guard Iman Shumpert. Since then, he has lead the New York Knicks onto a current six game win streak. What’s more astonishing is that Lin’s 109 points over the course of his first four starts are the most by any NBA player since the 1976-1977 season.

His road to success had not been an easy one. During his college basketball days, he had heard nearly every East Asian racial slur thrown at him while on the court, including “open your eyes”,
“wonton soup”, “orchestra’s on the other side of campus”, “sweet and sour pork”, and “go back to China.” One of his Harvard teammates recalls that once a fellow Ivy League player call him a “chink.” Even on one of his early training days with the Knicks before he exploded into superstardom, once when he went in for practice a security guard asked him if he was “one of the personal trainers.”

Nonetheless, Lin always kept his head and focus in the game. As a result, his hard work and dedication has finally paid off and gotten him to where he is today.

The ongoing story of Jeremy Lin sends a significant message out to the world in that you should never judge a book by its cover as well as to never judge a person by their stereotypes.